Fighting Hair Loss


1. GRADUAL HAIR LOSS

We also call it hormonal, progressive or hereditary hair loss.

GRADUAL HAIR LOSS caused by a reduced anagen (growth) phase, due to a gradual degeneration of the hair follicles. Each cycle becomes shorter than the one before. Finally, the follicle wears out completely, is reabsorbed, then disappears.

In order to fight this type of hair loss, you must PROLONG THE LIFE OF THE HAIR.


2. SUDDEN HAIR LOSS

We also call it reactional hair loss.

SUDDEN HAIR LOSS caused by a large number of hair follicles entering the telogen (shedding) phase early.

To treat this type of hair loss, you need to QUICKLY REACTIVATE HAIR GROWTH by triggering a new hair cycle.



1. GRADUAL HAIR LOSS

PERIOD:
Usually, it becomes noticeable after 6 months or more of hair thinning

SCENE:
Your hair is progressively losing thickness and some areas are thinning more than others.

TRIGGER:
The trigger cannot be identified. 

OTHER SYMPTOMS:
The thinning hair is often accompanied by excessive sebum excretion (oily scalp, greasy hair.) The hard moving scalp is also one of the common symptoms.


2. SUDDEN HAIR LOSS

PERIOD:
Becomes a noticeable 2-3 months after a stressful event to your body. You may suddenly see your hair everywhere: on a pillow, in a sink ... 

SCENE:
The hair loss is diffuse and concerns the entire head, rather than just an isolated area.

TRIGGER:
Trigger exist. Usually, you can identify trigger yourself, but not always. Things like: 

  • Seasonal changes
  • Stress, emotional shock
  • Restricted diet or a poor diet
  • Fatigue, overexertion, illness
  • Some medical treatments
  • Chemotherapy

 


1. GRADUAL HAIR LOSS

POOR CIRCULATION

Blood flow to the scalp is essential for well-balanced hair growth. The micro-circulatory system is what ensures the hair follicle receives the optimal supply of all the elements needed for good hair growth: vitamins (in particular B5, B6, and B8,) trace elements, oxygen, energy (vitamin B3, arginine, etc.,) and amino acids (arginine, methionine, cysteine, etc.) Poor micro-circulation makes hair loss worse.

HYPERSEBORRHEA

A hydrolipidic film made of sebum and sweat protects the surface of the scalp and hair. The sebum secretion is regulated by the hormone testosterone. Too much of this hormone causes over-production of sebum which can make hair loss worse.

RIGIDIFICATION AND INFLAMMATION OF THE DERMIS

Blood flow to the scalp is essential for well-balanced hair growth. The micro-circulatory system is what ensures the hair follicle receives the optimal supply of all the elements needed for good hair growth: vitamins (in particular B5, B6, and B8,) trace elements, oxygen, energy (vitamin B3, arginine, etc.,) and amino acids (arginine, methionine, cysteine, etc.) Poor micro-circulation makes hair loss worse.


2. SUDDEN HAIR LOSS

POOR CIRCULATION

Growth factors are responsible for increasing the blood flow to the hair follicle. This function is essential to regulating hair growth. Poor circulation to the scalp means the hair bulb does not receive the nutrients it needs and results in hair loss.

NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY

A deficient blood supply limits the number of nutrients, energy and trace elements that reach the hair, causing it to enter the telogen (shedding) phase too early.


1. GRADUAL HAIR LOSS

VASCULAR CAUSE: poor blood flow to the hair bulb means the hair does not get the essential elements it needs to grow.

HORMONAL CAUSE: hormonal imbalance causes excess sebum production which suffocates the hair.

TISSULAR CAUSE: the tissue surrounding the hair bulb becomes rigid and irritated, shortening the life of the hair.

IS IT POSSIBLE TO SLOW DOWN THIS HAIR LOSS?

In order to slow down gradual hair loss in women, you need to treat these three causes. Each can be responsible for gradual hair loss, alone or in combination with the other two.

However, it is almost impossible to know the exact combination of causes, so the best solution is to treat all three.


2. SUDDEN HAIR LOSS

Sudden hair loss is usually triggered by a specific event and occurs in the following 2-3 months.

The triggering event may be:

  • Seasonal changes
  • Stress, emotional shock
  • Restricted diet or a poor diet
  • Fatigue, overexertion
  • Illness
  • Some medical treatments
  • Chemotherapy

Hormonal imbalance. During pregnancy, estrogen increases drastically (x1000) throughout the whole body. Hair becomes shinier, softer, thicker, and the scalp is drier. About three months after giving birth, estrogen levels plummet. This sudden decrease in hormones causes a massive and simultaneous loss of hair.

The event causes hairs to enter the shedding phase early before completing the growth phase. This type of hair loss mainly affects women.

To treat this type of hair loss, you need to QUICKLY REACTIVATE HAIR GROWTH by triggering a new hair cycle.